Asheville, North Carolina
We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

 

 

How Cool is That! - Hummingbirds

 

 

 

 

Hummingbirds

 Fun Facts About Hummingbirds

  • There are 18 hummingbird species in North America. Hummingbirds are found no where else in the world except the New World (North, Central, and South America.)
  • There are over 325 species of hummingbirds, making them the second largest bird family in the world, second only to flycatchers.
  • Hummingbirds weigh 1/10th of an ounce; about the weight of a penny.
  • Hummingbirds’ brains are about the size of a BB.
  • Hummingbirds’ hearts are larger proportionally to their body than any other bird or mammal.
  • Hummingbirds have such underdeveloped legs that they are unable to walk well.
  • A mother hummingbird weighs only about eight times more than her egg.
  • Hummingbirds lay the world’s smallest bird egg.
  • Hummingbirds generally lay two eggs, each about the size of a blueberry.
  • Hummingbirds learn to associate flower colors, like red, with food. They do not have an innate preference for red.
  • They drink nectar from plants and sugar water from feeders.
  • Hummingbirds lap up nectar with their long tongues. There is a groove on either side of the tongue that creates a capillary action to help draw the nectar up the tongue and into the mouth during the lapping action.
  • While lapping up nectar, Hummingbirds can move their tongues in and out of their bill at a rate of up to 12 times a second.

 

Calcium for Nesting Birds

Calcium is the most challenging mineral for birds because when they need it in their diet they need large quantities and they need it right away. This is mainly during nesting time for egg laying as well as chick development. The amount of calcium in their natural diet of seeds and insects is often inadequate and they must seek calcium-rich foods as a supplement. Ask us about the many bird foods we offer which include calcium and help your nesting birds.

 

 

How to Attract More Birds with Peanuts

 

 

 

 

 Dash & Cache

Right now chickadees, nuthatches, titmice and jays are hiding food to retrieve and eat at a later time. This behavior is called “caching.” Caching helps birds survive during bad weather and when food sources are low. These birds can store hundreds of seeds a day. Each seed is placed in a different location and they generally remember where each one is, even a month later.

By providing an easily accessible food source, you can help your birds with their caching needs.

Chickadees prefer to cache black oil sunflower seeds; often eating a small portion before hiding it in and under bark, dead leaves, knotholes, clusters of pine needles, gutters, shingles and in the ground. Chickadees cache more in the middle of the day when visiting feeders.

Titmice are rather particular. They choose the largest sunflower seeds available to eat and cache. Titmice and chickadees like to cache seeds within 130 feet of bird feeders; your yard or a neighbor's yard. Often, they tuck seeds into the bark and crevices of a wood pile or on a large branch. They even cache them under mulch in a garden.

Nuthatches prefer heavier sunflower seeds over the lighter ones. Be sure to have some sunflower chips in your blend, too, as they like these 25% more than one in the shell. They cache more in the morning and prefer to hide foods on deeply furrowed tree trunks and the underside of branches. Nuthatches are also known to hide seeds under a shingle or behind wooden siding.

Jays love to cache peanuts, sunflower seeds and acorns. They are especially fond of peanuts in the shell. They bury them in the ground and are known to cache about 100 in a day; emptying a feeder in no time. Watch for them make repeated trips to your feeders (or an oak tree) and fly off. They can travel up to two miles to bury their nutritious treasure.